A how to: Locking a Clod Diff.

Talk about the Clod Buster, and all other motor on axle trucks here.
Unruely
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A how to: Locking a Clod Diff.

Post by Unruely »

I thought it might be a good idea to repost this.

Note! I did this a while back on my Clodzilla 4, it is geared more for
a novice than someone with experience. I did this to show someone
who has never done it a detailed set of instructions on one way to
accomplish it.Your comments and suggestions are more than
welcome.

Part 1:

I'm going to try and provide a guide on how to lock a differential
on a Clod truck. I decide to do this project after searching and not
being able to find a good description of how to do this anywhere on
the web. I am by no means an expert on this, but my method works.
There may also be other ways of doing this. The advantages of a
locked diff are greatly increased traction while pulling or climbing.
The disadvantages are increased turning radius, somewhat
increased wear on tires and some driveline parts. I have found 2
different glues that work well for locking the gears; both are 2 part
epoxies, which require mixing. J B Weld, and a new product I found
at a local automotive supply store called "Plastic Welding System"
it is designed special for plastics. (See pic 1-2)
Image
Next. It’s time to tear things apart. This pic shows it before I begin,
and with the wheels removed. During this project, it is also a good
time for a good cleaning of any off-road grime which has
accumulated, check for any loose hardware, and damage which
needs repair, and a time for a good oil/grease where needed
Image
Next step is to prepare to remove the steering linkages and all
suspension links. Depending on your truck these may vary
somewhat, but should be similar.
Image
More linkages to be removed, along with the pivot bolts. Hint: If
you sometimes have trouble remembering how things fit back
together, take some pics with a camera, make sketches, or even
use a camcorder. It will give you an instant reference on how
everything fits. (Not that I have ever had this problem!)
Image
Now you can see the steering links and pivot bolts removed. Next
the wheel hubs have been removed. I find it helpful, after removing
any nuts or washers from a bolt, place them back on the bolt in the
same arrangement they were removed. It keeps everything together
and less likely to lose any small parts.
Image
More linkages removed. Finally after removing everything
necessary, the axle is free from the truck (Note! I missed getting
any pics of removing the motor and servo mount. They share the
same mounting screws, so it is pretty straightforward.)
Image
Now we are ready to open up the axle housing. The screws marked
"a" are the ones we need to remove. The sleeves marked "b" are
what the motor/servo mount screws pass thru. Use caution when
opening the case up as these sleeves are a tight fit thru the case,
just go-slow and you won't have a problem.
Image
Now the case is open, we can see what we will be dealing with.
Image
"Just doing what I can with what I got!"
Bert Gummer

Unruely
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Location: West Virginia

Part 2:

Post by Unruely »

Part 2

These are the gears we are concerned with. First thing to do is
thoroughly degrease them with a non-caustic cleaner, so as not to
harm the plastic gears. Now that they are clean, let them dry for a
while and before proceeding, make sure they are completely dry.
Image
OK, now that the gears have finished drying, we can start the
locking/gluing process. The areas to apply the epoxy are indicated
in the first pic. The second shows the gears assembled. Depending
on the type of epoxy, the drying time will vary. If you will be using
J B Weld, it would be best to allow them to dry overnight for full
strength. The PWS epoxy I used for this project dries solid in about
15 minutes. I do not recommend using this PWS epoxy indoors as
the fumes are very strong! Even with using the faster dry PWS, I
will still allow it to set overnight before running the truck.
Image
Before the glue dries totally, take the time to make certain that
you don't have any excess squirting out, check the areas I have
indicated. If it has already dried some, you can very carefully use a
knife to trim the excess. Now is also the time to check the 4
screws in each axle half, make certain they are tight now, because
the only way to do this is with it taken apart. The last thing you
want is for a screw to come out, and bounce around inside with all
the gears.
Image
After waiting the recommended time for the epoxy to dry, it is time to begin reassembly. The pics show the gears back in their proper
location, along with a couple of areas to apply a small amount of
grease. You can use hobby type diff grease, white lithium grease or
a good silicone base grease. Be careful not to use too much, as it
will just work its way out and attract a lot of extra dirt.
Image
Now we can start putting the 2 axle halves back together making
certain that all the gears mesh together properly, and all shafts are
aligned. Be careful with the 2 motor screw sleeves as they fit
rather snug. It may also be necessary to rotate one or both of the
stub axle shafts to allow the unit to slip into their proper positions.
Go ahead and start all the screws in, but don't tighten completely,
until you are certain everything is in proper alignment. I have found
it helpful to mark the motor screw hole with a little paint; it allows my feeble old eyes to align it quicker when reattaching it to the
gear case.
Image
Now begin to re-mount the axle to the frame/links, starting with the
sway bar mount if your Clod is so equipped. After the axle
assemble is partly in position, go ahead and attach the motor and
servo mount using the shared screws.
Image
The next step will be to reattach all of the upper and lower
suspension links. After the suspension linkages are attached we
will re-install the wheel/axle hubs. Apply a small amount of
powdered graphite to the shoulder of the pivot bolt before running it
all the way in. Do not over tighten the pivot bolt, as it will not
allow the hubs to pivot freely.
Image
We continue attaching the wheel hubs and begin to attach the
steering linkages in their proper locations, being certain to place
the conical washers where they were originally. At this time we
also mount the bumper back to the axle housing.
Image
Finally we finish attaching all the steering linkages, checking for
any possible interference, which would not allow it to work
smoothly. After this is complete, go back over everything and make
sure you have it all hooked up proper, and all the screws and bolts
are tightened properly.
Image
All that is left is to reattach the wheels and we are done! Ready to
put the body back on, drop in a fresh battery pack, and take it out
crawling!

Martin
"Just doing what I can with what I got!"
Bert Gummer

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Krod Clod
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diff locking article

Post by Krod Clod »

Unruely,

That was an excellent article on how to lock your diffs!
If its alright with you i'd like to host it on my site because you are correct when you say there is hardly any place that lists how to do it. You will be given full credit for the article, i just think it deserves a perminant home :D

MAtt
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black is back

Unruely
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Location: West Virginia

Post by Unruely »

Matt

Help yourself, Glad you liked it..

Martin
"Just doing what I can with what I got!"
Bert Gummer

badhoopty
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Post by badhoopty »

great post.

this should be locked and stickied imo.

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superjay5
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Location: Michigan

Post by superjay5 »

Lick it and stick Bill, or any mod that may see this, please!
JEEP-Just Empty Every Pocket

Adam F
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Post by Adam F »

Excellent post.


You can also use plain old hot glue. Makes the job much easier, and you could probably remove the locker if needed. I just put the diff back together, and squirted hot glue inbetween the spider gears while holding the 2 side gears together. And it only takes a few minutes to completely dry and then you can run them right away!

Itsik
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Post by Itsik »

Excellent post indeed!

One little advice tough, cause I have'nt been able to find it in the original post. (If it's there and I missed it, sorry...)

Once you applied the glue to both sides of the diff, and let it set for just a little, it is a good idea to insert the dogbones into the diff from both sides to make sure the diff is centered and will not wobble once it's back in the gear box.

Image

Disregard the red stuff,it is there to keep the glue from oozing (this was taken when only one side had been glues :wink: )

My two cents...

Itsik

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Krod Clod
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Post by Krod Clod »

This has also been added to my site for reference in the future.
GOOD ARTICLE :D


Krod Clod Online/clodarticles

MAtt
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black is back

ClodWorx
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Post by ClodWorx »

Hey, Unruely,
good "HOWTOO"

Really well laid out

Element
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Post by Element »

Well aftert saying I was going to do it for 3 months I finally locked my diffs
It crawls so good but my turning radius kindof sucks now its not to bad but coudl be improved :(

Also I used stick tac instead of jb wled that way i can remove it if I ever run into a problem. :wink:
it's true. whos the world series champs? CARDINALS!

skrewdriver
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Post by skrewdriver »

what other side effects are there from locking your diffs? steering is a issue, right? can that be solved in a inexpencive way...maybe something home made? If its like a real car, then tier wear is an issue too if you stay onroad. but i would use it only for offroad use. so are there any other problems? should i lock the front and rear? or just one of them?

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Halgar
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Post by Halgar »

Locking the diff will wear the tires slightly faster than normal, but probably imperceptibly. Steering is the only real issue and the quick and cheap fix is to mount the servo to the axle (front and rear if you wat 4ws ). Once you do this, you'll have better control of the steering over the stock location. The only other thing is to grind the turn stops down a little bit on the c-hubs so that there is a little more throw, but you can ONLY do this if you've installed a 4 link suspension because the stock ladderbars will not allow the tires to turn any sharper than stock limits.
I used to think I was indecisive, but now I'm not so sure.

skrewdriver
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Post by skrewdriver »

how does one mount the steering servo to the axle? does anyone have a picture of what it looks like?
I also have another question, an a geko chassis, where do the four link bars attach to? does anyone have a picture of this? Im asking because Im planning to build a custom geko knock-off and i need to know where the links attach to. and also, the springs, where do they attach on the chassis? and where do they attach on the axle? does anyone have apicture of this?

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Halgar
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Post by Halgar »

skrewdriver wrote:how does one mount the steering servo to the axle? does anyone have a picture of what it looks like?
I also have another question, an a geko chassis, where do the four link bars attach to? does anyone have a picture of this? Im asking because Im planning to build a custom geko knock-off and i need to know where the links attach to. and also, the springs, where do they attach on the chassis? and where do they attach on the axle? does anyone have apicture of this?
The easiest answer to both your questions is to go look in the readers rides forum. Most of the trucks in there have both a 4-link suspension and axle mounted servos. There are many ways to do both of these things, and the readers rides forum is the best place to see what's being done and how.
I used to think I was indecisive, but now I'm not so sure.